Last edited by Bagrel
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

13 edition of Plato on the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists found in the catalog.

Plato on the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists

by Marina McCoy

  • 123 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plato,
  • Gorgias, -- of Leontini,
  • Rhetoric,
  • Philosophers,
  • Sophists (Greek philosophy)

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-207) and index

    StatementMarina McCoy
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB395 .M296 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 212 p. ;
    Number of Pages212
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17239784M
    ISBN 100521878632
    ISBN 109780521878630
    LC Control Number2007007242

    Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and dge: Cambridge University Press, , viii p. ISBN Recension par Evan G. Rodriguez and Ravi Sharma (California State University, Long Beach) dans Bryn Mawr . Send Email. Recipient(s) will receive an email with a link to 'Review: Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists, by Marina McCoy' and will not need an account to access the content.

      Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists by Marina McCoy New York: Cambridge University Press, vii + pp. $, hardcover. With her new book, Marina McCoy, an assistant professor of philosophy at Boston College, succeeds in opening up new lines of inquiry into Plato's formative engagement(s) with rhetoric: first, by involving other Platonic dialogues in the Author: Svoboda, Michael. In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and.

      Plato viewed them as the anti-philosophers. They did not care for objective truth or wisdom, only in convincing others through dubious and questionable means. To Plato, the Sophists, as well as rhetoric in general, was something of a disease that infected the minds of citizens and distracted them from the noble pursuits of philosophy. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review). Richard D. Parry - - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp.


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Plato on the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists by Marina McCoy Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras.

She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their by: This book explores how Plato separates the philosopher from the sophist through the dramatic opposition of Socrates to rhetoricians and sophists. In one way, its thesis is simple.

Plato distinguishes Socrates from the sophists by differences in character and moral intention. In the broadest terms, Plato might agree with Aristotle's claim in the Rhetoric that what defines a sophist is “not his faculty, but his moral.

Overview In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and : $   Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists - Kindle edition by McCoy, Marina.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and : $ Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists The “philosophers and sophists” of this book’s title are not the historical figures whose work forms the intellectual background to Plato’s.

Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists Inthisbook,MarinaMcCoyexploresPlato’streatmentoftherhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedrus.

She argues that Plato presents the. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. By Marina McCoy and Plato and the Art of Philosophical : Robin Waterfield. This collection, focusing on literary aspects of the Platonic dialogues, includes stimulating and diverse essays by scholars from several different fields.

Plato, the critic, satirist, and (perhaps) inventor of "rhetoric" framed his own discourse in complex ways. "Republic" is a mimetic text that presents a sophisticated analysis of the various types of mimesis; "Phaedrus," featuring embedded.

Commentators on the Gorgias have suggested numerous distinctions between philosophy and rhetoric: (1) philosophy requires the consistency of one's beliefs, while rhetoric consists of merely verbal refutation; (2) philosophy requires a commitment to reason that the sophists lack; (3) the philosopher is committed to a different understanding of Author: Marina McCoy.

From the catalogue entry on the Cambridge site, the description reads: n this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato’s treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedrus.

Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished by the philosopher's love of the forms as the ultimate objects of desire.

It is this love of the forms that informs the philosopher's rhetoric, which he uses to lead his. Download Citation | Plato on the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists | In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato’s treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic.

Description: In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and : Marina McCoy.

"In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedrus. SOPHIST PERSONS OF THE DIALOGUE: Theodorus, Theaetetus, Socrates.

An Eleatic Stranger, whom Theodorus and Theaetetus bring with them. The younger Socrates, who is a silent auditor. THEODORUS: Here we are, Socrates, true to our agreement of yesterday; and we bring with us a stranger from Elea, who is a disciple of.

Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists, Cambridge University Press,pp., $ (hbk), ISBN Reviewed by Eugene Garver, Saint John's University Marina McCoy's book has a simple thesis: "Plato distinguishes Socrates from the sophists by differences in character and moral intention" (p.

Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Michael Svoboda - - Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (2):pp. Review of Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.

[REVIEW] Evan Rodriguez & Ravi Sharma - - Bryn Mawr Classical Review (). Plato's Dream of d Marback - Author: Marina Mccoy. Nevertheless, Plato clearly believed that the philosopher and the sophist were different.

McCoy argues that the fundamental difference lies in the philosopher's orientation towards the forms, rather than the socio‐political realities with which the sophists were : Robin Waterfield. In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras.

In the introduction, Tell ties the sophists’ intellectual ostracism to Plato’s and Aristotle’s misrepresentation and suppression of competing articulations of philosophy. In defining philosophy for their own enterprises, Plato and Aristotle misleadingly characterized the sophists as a unique and intellectually homogeneous group.This book explores how Plato separates the philosopher from the sophist through the dramatic opposition of Socrates to rhetoricians and sophists.

In one way, its thesis is simple. Plato distinguishes Socrates from the sophists by differences in character and moral intention.Plato's Relationship to Rhetoric/Plato's Denunciation of Rhetoric in the PhaedrusRhetoric Review (): Disassembling Plato's Critique of Rhetoric in the GorgiasRhetoric Review 11 (): Murray, James S.

"Disputation, Deception, and Dialectic: Plato on the True Rhetoric (Phaedrus )." Philosophy & Rhetoric 21 (